Videos :: Book Sharing Monday

My daughter, MeiLi, has always been intrigued by the programs on the Science Channel and PBS.  She has stayed up late to watch documentaries on WWII.  When writing to a pen pal recently, she responded to the typical question, “Do you like Hannah Montana?”  with “No.  I don’t watch Hannah Montana.  My favorite T.V. shows are Oregon Field Guide and How It’s Made.  I also like other science shows.”

As homeschoolers, we go to the library generally every week and spend a few hours browsing.  Between activities, we even use the study rooms to get caught up on our formal lessons.  This past year, I have seen remarkable growth or independence emerge from both of the kiddos.  They know where their favorite books are and they know how to use the card catalog (I still call it that, but it’s all online now).  I believe that their comfort in the library is partially due to the field trip we took earlier this year.

When we visited the library today, MeiLi asked where she could find the National Geographic videos.  I explained that those were upstairs in the “adult section” but that she was welcome to go up on her own to find what she was looking for as I needed to stay in the vicinity of her little brother, who tends to wander off in search of adventure if I don’t keep an eye on him. 

She was a little apprehensive at first but I assured her that a librarian would likely be seated at the reference table if she was in need of assistance.  When she returned about 15 minutes later, these are the titles she had selected.  I wasn’t surprised.

Thus far, we have viewed only one, “Birds of Oregon” which is essentially a compilation of all the bird segments that have aired on Oregon Field Guide.  She and I were both quite impressed with the diversity of the birds that are found here.  She asked if we couldn’t go on more bird watching expeditions.  “Most certainly!” was my reply. 

I love the freedom of homeschooling.  

About Eva Varga

Eva is passionate about education. She has extensive experience in both formal and informal settings. She presently homeschools her two young children, teaches professional development courses through the Heritage Institute, and writes a middle level secular science curriculum called Science Logic. In addition to her work in education, she is an athlete, competing in Masters swimming events and marathons. In her spare time she enjoys reading, traveling, learning new languages, and above all spending time with her family. ♥