The Ins & Outs of Science Fairs

More often than not, when you talk to families about science (whether they homeschool or not), you will find one thing in common. The dreaded science fair.

“It’s such a chore! I don’t see the value in it!”

Entering a science fair project into a competition involves more than just completing a fun science experiment. The student needs to have a great idea and then create an informative and eye-catching display as well as demonstrate presentation and interview skills.

Competing at local, regional, and state science fairs is a great way for students to learn more about science. Participation encourages an open mind, tenacity enough to find an answer to your question, critical thinking skills, and honesty.

Over the next five days, I will walk you through all the ins and outs of science fairs.

science fairs

 

Tuesday – Types of Science Fair Projects

Most science fairs allow a variety of projects to be exhibited and there are a few different types of projects that students can choose from. On Tuesday, I’ll share several types of science fair projects and for what grade level they are best suited.

Wednesday – Inquiry Based Science Fair Projects 

Inquiry based activities closely resemble the skills and processes of science undertaken by scientists and incorporate the nature of science in more meaningful ways than traditional, cookbook type labs. Be sure to stop by Wednesday to learn more about inquiry based science fair projects.

Thursday – Preparing Your Display Board & Presentation

You’ve selected a topic, gathered your materials, and worked through your project.  You’re now ready to present.  Join me on Thursday when I walk you through the steps for preparing a display board and provide tips for a great oral presentation.

Friday – Getting the Most Out of a Science Fair

Not only are science fairs a great confidence builder, students often find inspiration and ideas they would like to pursue themselves.  On Friday, I’ll share tips for getting the most out of science fairs – as a participant and as an observer. 

About Eva Varga

Eva is passionate about education. She has extensive experience in both formal and informal settings. She presently homeschools her two young children, teaches professional development courses through the Heritage Institute, and writes a middle level secular science curriculum called Science Logic. In addition to her work in education, she is an athlete, competing in Masters swimming events and marathons. In her spare time she enjoys reading, traveling, learning new languages, and above all spending time with her family. ♥