Homeschoolers Are Different

We had an interesting conversation the other night. We were driving home from TKD and I encouraged MeiLi to ask the new girl her name next time. MeiLi then began to ponder aloud, “She seems nice. I wonder if she homeschools. I think she might.” 

I inquire why she assumed this and her response was, “Because she is interested in TKD. She looks like a homeschooler.”
 

“What does a homeschooler look like?”
 

“Like me.”
 

“Well Wren, Ella and Valerie don’t look like you, what do you mean?” “
 

“I don’t know. Homeschoolers are different.”
 

“What makes you say that? Can you explain.”
 

“I don’t really know. They just are. I can’t explain it very well. They just seem to know more and talk about other things besides Hannah Montana and that Justin guy, I forget his name.”

“Justin Bieber?” I ask.
 

“Yeah. Who is that?” I explain and then the conversation resumes.

“Homeschoolers don’t talk about clothes and stuff like that all the time,” MeiLi says.

Then Buddy asks, “Who is Hannah Montana?”

Homeschooling has actually REALLY encouraged me seeing the academic, play, creative, active differences in kids.  When sharing these observations with another homeschool mom, she said that her son had the same revelation.  He had said to her that he was so different from the kids – her initial response was, “Uh-oh!”  But he went on to say his confidence is really high, “I like this kind of different.”

So many kids don’t want to be different. Her kids say, “We don’t really even care that much about video games or what is cool. We just want some friends who talk about something else besides movies, pop music, and video games.”   My two would concur, but they do like video games on occasion as well. 

About Eva Varga

Eva is passionate about education. She has extensive experience in both formal and informal settings. She presently homeschools her two young children, teaches professional development courses through the Heritage Institute, and writes a middle level secular science curriculum called Science Logic. In addition to her work in education, she is an athlete, competing in Masters swimming events and marathons. In her spare time she enjoys reading, traveling, learning new languages, and above all spending time with her family. ♥

3 comments on “Homeschoolers Are Different

  1. I want to repost this but fear I will offend my PS friends who follow my blog FB page. I’ve noticed a big difference too. My 7 yo feels different from PS kids but doesn’t know why yet. I hope he takes the attitude that your children do. Unfortunately, my kids do talk about video games but like plenty of other things too. 🙂

  2. I think I’d like this friend. 😉 We had two families come from Portland to meet the boys. 6 kids, 8 all together, and they all got along instantly. Ages 8-13. Boys and Girls. They had to be ripped apart at the end of the day. With each gathering we encounter with PS kids, the Gender and Age segregation grows wider. Sigh. We will join a new HS Co-Op on Thursday. They havn’t been in a ‘group’ since we left. I’m excited!

  3. Pingback: 10 Years & We're Still At It: A look at why we homeschool - Eva Varga

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